[cmsms_row data_padding_bottom=”50″ data_padding_top=”0″ data_overlay_opacity=”50″ data_color_overlay=”#000000″ data_bg_parallax_ratio=”0.5″ data_bg_size=”cover” data_bg_attachment=”scroll” data_bg_repeat=”no-repeat” data_bg_position=”top center” data_bg_color=”#ffffff” data_color=”default” data_padding_right=”3″ data_padding_left=”3″ data_width=”boxed”][cmsms_column data_width=”1/1″][cmsms_text animation_delay=”0″]

Behaviors That Make A Likeable Leader

Leadership is about many things, like creating and advancing the vision, holding teams accountable and producing results. It is also about emotional intelligence and knowing how to become a likeable, respected and motivational leader for your team.

Dr. Travis Bradberry has identified 10 distinctively simple and powerful behaviors of likeable leaders. Bradberry is the award-winning co-author of the bestselling book, Emotional Intelligence 2.0, and the cofounder of TalentSmart, the world’s leading provider of emotional intelligence tests and training, serving more than 75% of Fortune 500 companies.

Here are my favorite seven behaviors that make emotionally intelligent leaders so likeable:

1. They Form Personal Connections — Even in a crowded room, likeable leaders make people feel like they’re having a one-on-one conversation, as if they’re the only person in the room that matters. Likeable leaders communicate on a very personal, emotional level.

2. They’re Approachable — You know those people who only have time for you if you can do something for them? Likeable leaders truly believe that everyone, regardless of rank or ability, is worth their time and attention.

3. They’re Humble — Few things kill likeability as quickly as arrogance. Likeable leaders don’t act as though they’re better than you because they don’t think that they’re better than you.

4. They’re Positive — Likeable leaders always maintain a positive outlook, and this shows in how they describe things. Even in undeniably negative situations, likeable leaders emanate an enthusiastic hope for the future, a confidence that they can help make tomorrow better than today.

5. They’re Generous — We have all worked for someone who constantly holds something back, whether it’s knowledge or resources. Likeable leaders are unfailingly generous with whom they know, what they know, and the resources to which they have access.

6. They Read People Like A Book — Likeable leaders know how to read people, as unspoken communication is often more important than the words people say. In short, they have high social awareness: a critical EQ skill.

7. They Have Substance — Daniel Quinn said, “Charisma only wins people’s attention. Once you have their attention, you have to have something to tell them.” Likeable leaders understand that their knowledge and expertise are critical to the success of everyone who follows them.

Bradberry suggests adopting and using these strategies to watch your likeability soar.

[/cmsms_text][/cmsms_column][/cmsms_row][cmsms_row data_padding_bottom=”50″ data_padding_top=”0″ data_overlay_opacity=”50″ data_color_overlay=”#000000″ data_bg_parallax_ratio=”0.5″ data_bg_size=”cover” data_bg_attachment=”scroll” data_bg_repeat=”no-repeat” data_bg_position=”top center” data_bg_color=”#ffffff” data_color=”default” data_padding_right=”3″ data_padding_left=”3″ data_width=”boxed”][cmsms_column data_width=”1/1″][cmsms_divider type=”solid” margin_top=”5″ margin_bottom=”5″ animation_delay=”0″][/cmsms_column][/cmsms_row][cmsms_row data_padding_bottom=”50″ data_padding_top=”0″ data_overlay_opacity=”50″ data_color_overlay=”#000000″ data_bg_parallax_ratio=”0.5″ data_bg_size=”cover” data_bg_attachment=”scroll” data_bg_repeat=”no-repeat” data_bg_position=”top center” data_bg_color=”#ffffff” data_color=”default” data_padding_right=”3″ data_padding_left=”3″ data_width=”boxed”][cmsms_column data_width=”1/1″][cmsms_text animation_delay=”0″]

When To Present And When To Converse

Meeting hosts often think that presenting to a room full of people is the best way to share ideas. But sometimes it’s better to have a conversation, where other voices are considered and different views are exchanged.

That’s Nancy Duarte‘s point of view, author of the new HBR Guide to Persuasive Presentations, and two award-winning books on the art of presenting, Slide:ology and Resonate. Her team at Duarte, Inc., has created more than a quarter of a million presentations for its clients and teaches public and corporate workshops on presenting.

How do you decide which approach to take?

  • Map out what you’re trying to accomplish and carefully considering your meeting goals.
  • If you are informing or persuading, plan to present. If you’re looking for give-and-take, you won’t get it by speaking at length. More likely, you’ll shut folks down.
  • Facilitating a conversation is a better way to solicit ideas, but it’s harder to do. In presenting, you have almost total control. You simply focus on the message and delivery to engage an audience.
  • When leading a conversation, you open the door to many challenges. You want to encourage thought sharing freely and honestly, but that also means you have to juggle multiple viewpoints, manage conflicts, and assure everyone is heard.

The benefits of having a conversation outweigh the risks – if you do it right. Facilitation is a skill that takes time to develop. Here are a couple of techniques to help you get started:

Source Eric AlbertsonCollaborate with sticky notes and flip charts — To encourage brainstorming and building on each other’s ideas, use sticky notes and flip charts to gather the information rather than having one note taker. Attendees can capture ideas quickly, cluster them, and rearrange them. Use different colors to distinguish between types of content and different sizes to denote hierarchy.

Sticky notes and flip chart pages on the wall allow the group to see all the ideas and incorporates the benefits of kinesthetic learning by encouraging

movement by writing, standing and physically shifting ideas. Whenever Nancy builds a presentation, writes a book, or thinks of a new initiative, she posts thoughts on sticky notes and printouts on the wall. She invites a bunch of smart people to come in and review, remove, and re-organize my notes to refine her idea.

Capture the meeting graphically — Visual note taking, doodling, graphic recording, sketching – whatever you call it, can greatly enhance collaborative meetings. People who see what you’re saying can understand you more quickly and clearly. If you record notes visually, especially on a mural, attendees retain more details through visual memory and spatial recall. You have an artifact that can be displayed to remind the team of the discussion. Visualizing helps participants pay attention, stay engaged, clarify individual ideas, and see the big picture. A large-scale graphic provided by an experienced facilitator summarizes and memorializes the discussion. And it serves as the next meeting’s starting point.

Nancy says these two techniques can turn even the most lethargic and uninterested groups of people into active contributors working together to get something done.

Presenting can go a long way toward changing minds and bringing people together around a common idea. But when it’s input and consensus that you need, Nancy says consider having a conversation. This can help you turn boring meetings into experiences that leave people excited and energized.

[/cmsms_text][cmsms_divider type=”solid” margin_top=”5″ margin_bottom=”5″ animation_delay=”0″][/cmsms_column][/cmsms_row][cmsms_row data_padding_bottom=”50″ data_padding_top=”0″ data_overlay_opacity=”50″ data_color_overlay=”#000000″ data_bg_parallax_ratio=”0.5″ data_bg_size=”cover” data_bg_attachment=”scroll” data_bg_repeat=”no-repeat” data_bg_position=”top center” data_bg_color=”#ffffff” data_color=”default” data_padding_right=”3″ data_padding_left=”3″ data_width=”boxed”][cmsms_column data_width=”1/1″][cmsms_text animation_delay=”0″]

9 Tech Tools For PR Success

We know that what makes PR such a dynamic and interesting field is also what makes the answer difficult to pin down, as it is constantly changing and evolving to fit the needs of new audiences and clients.

However, PR Week feels there are three fundamentals that will always remain important in the industry: Organization, Creativity and Distribution. Below are the magazine’s list of nine great tools that will help you get a handle on those fundamentals:

  • Organize Yourself And Your Team — PR professionals have a significant number of tasks and projects to manage and being organized is critical. Try these tools:
    1. Trello — its interface allows you to add pictures, files, labels, tasks and keep track of your team’s progress.
    2. Smartsheet — if you’re more old school and prefer the reliability of spreadsheets for your internal communication needs, Smartsheet is strong.
    3. HootSuite — one of the best social media managers around. Schedule posts and manage your social networks (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, etc) on one dashboard.
  • Get Creative — working in PR often encompasses several jobs at once — expert in audience activity, social media trends, writing, etc. Now graphic design is part of that list as PR is a visual field and these are the latest to tools to visualize your campaigns:
    1. Canva — an industry favorite, Canva’s platform allows you to easily create eye-catching graphics, with a wide selection of free and paid fonts, headlines, and templates. They recently added infographic options as well.
    2. Easel.ly — speaking of infographics, Easel.ly is well-known for providing a simple space for creating professional-looking charts and graphics. Organize your information and data in an appealing way using their large collection of shapes, symbols, and more
    3. Pixabay — the first thing people will notice is the photograph. Sites like Pixabay are great for finding free, high quality stock images to pair with your posts and articles.
  • Distribute Your Content — content distribution is a key component to PR success. Use these tools to get your product to the right audiences:
    1. BlogsRelease — is the #1 PR marketplace where brands connect with influencers by uploading blogger review campaigns for products, events, and news.
    2. Contently — with a particular focus on storytelling, Contently specializes in creating and distributing quality content. With a bevy of tools, including ROI measurement, this is definitely a must-try.
    3. SocialMention — this simple and free tool allows you to see what’s trending on the web. Simply type in your keyword and see its strength, reach, and whether it’s getting a positive or negative response. Services like SocialMention are great to consult before publishing your content to see what topics get the most audience engagement.

[/cmsms_text][/cmsms_column][/cmsms_row]