Real Time PR & Marketing

Real Time PR & Marketing

Just completed a great Vocus Webinar featuring David Meerman Scott, author of the New Rules of Marketing and PR and the upcoming book Real-Time Marketing and PR.

David talks about these benefits of Real-Time MPR including:

1. Connecting with customers— citing Charmin's Sit and Squat IPhone app to find public toilets around the world. 

2. Creating products — he described how the Dead (derivative of Grateful Dead) uses Twitter, Iphone apps to sell CDS and merchandise immediately after concerts. 

3. Listening to the market – Avaya sold $250K of phones based on pursuing a tweet asking about phone Digital clock systems.

4. Tapping the crowd — Kodak named its new underwater, video camera Playsport based on crowd sourcing for new names. 

5. Engaging the media— media like wsj.com offer the chance to know and then the ability to contact media about stories in progress.

6.  Managing crisis – he described a power law which indicates that the most opportune time for action is when a crisis happens not later. Later = listening to your message drops. My idea that news will fill the vacuum. He cited success of Clinton-Bush Haiti relief fundraising as a real-time crisis support success.

And he suggests that to grow your opportunities in real time, you will benefit from:

1. Appoointing a Chief Real Time Officer, who is in charge of RT opportunities and challenges.

2. Implementing a Real-Time system of monitoring and responding to customers, employees. media, etc.

3. Creating a Real-Time mindset — check out what Taylor Guitars and Calton guitar cases did to promote their business and even create products based on the United Breaks Guitars YouTube video.   

And finally, be sure to subscribe to David's blog in real time or now, if you prefer.

User Comments ( 8 )

  • Kevin — Wow you were paying attention! Thanks for the writeup. I hope you like the book too. It is out November 1.

  • My pleasure. I surprise myself with my good notetaking. It’s easy as your presentations and writing are always powerful, compelling, sensible and yet simple. Keep up the great work. Already ordered book and look forward to reading it. Sounds like you received great positive comments on the webinar. Good for you and the cause. Posting about Sun Mountain and its Ryder Cup Waterproofgate this week and referring again to this session and book. Have a terrific week.

  • Yeah, the twitter stream was wild yesterday. Hundreds of tweets. Sort of proves the point on real-time, doesn’t it?

  • It sure does prove it. And to convince management of the value of RT thinking there is nothing more powerful than the 6 points above. Agreed? Sleep clears and inspries the mind, right? Have a terrific day,

  • This is a good summary! Tweeted it out and will bookmark it for reference! Thanks, Kevin!

  • Thanks, Frank. It was an excellent webinar. Fortunate to have been on the call. Have a terrific week, and thanks again.

  • This is ALL good, Kevin and David, and then there’s the most basic of concepts — getting corporations to understand social media in the first place. We can cite Gap and Sun Chips as examples.
    Publicity stunts or not, this is egg-on-face communications. Where are all the agencies to provide counsel? Why is research dead? Why are these debacles allowed to happen, and more to the point, why is corporate America caving due to social media outcry on a logo that is not likely to hinder jeans sales?
    Case studies abound for academics to share these teachable moments. My rant is more audible in today’s blog post.

  • Hi Jayme,
    Smart thoughts.Agog and aghast. Seems so simple but why do CEOs, brands and corporations continue to mismanage crises? Like this NY Times http://nyti.ms/biWqpb story suggests, CEOs seem to face crisis the same way kids face a roller coaster. They get on, hang on and then hope it’s over fast. Rarely is. Ask Tiger Woods, Tony Hayward, Akio Toyoda or Lloyd Blankfein. Especially when Google keeps the information. A recent Google search on Toyota accelerator reported more than 1,300,000 results. Yikes.

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